Budapest Hungary

Budapest street food

When we arrived in Budapest, we didn’t realize the one extra day we had was on a National Holiday. We weren’t sure what was opened so we wandered around the city. We had just finished visiting St. Stephen’s Basilica and headed toward the Budapest Eye ferris /observation wheel.

All off a sudden I spotted a stand selling buns or rolls of some sort. The guy was rolling dough on a stick and then putting the stick over coal.  The aroma was amazing!  I knew I would be getting this, but I wanted to check out the rest of the street vendors first.

  
  

We continued on with the street fair, checking out other vendors who sold wine, like Glühwein, candy, paprika, embroidered items, knickknacks and food! Lots of food!  Oh my goodness was this a feast for the eyes and nose.  Our tour guide from the Viking tour said that Hungarian food is heavy, and meat laden.  They were not kidding.  I didn’t really see any fresh vegetables being sold, but lots of meats, potatoes, and well, grease!

  
  

The food vendors were making everything from sausage, to cabbage rolls, to goose leg to pork. The food stands smelled so good, we ended up buying some for a 4:00 early dinner.  Apparently except for the sausage, the food is sold by weight. So you can get as little or as much of an item as you wish, and they weigh the food at the cashier.


  
  

For dinner, Stephen chose a Hungarian sausage and a blood sausage with sauerkraut, while I got the pork loin with 2 types of potatoes: boiled with parsley and fried with paprika. The cashier weighed the food, and with the 2 diet cokes, dinner came to 10,300 FT or roughly $30.  I was tempted to add the goose leg, but what we got was plenty, not to mention a very heavy meal.

  

After dinner, we did go back to the first stand, and got the cinnamon rolled bread to take back to the hotel.  The bag was piping hot with steam still coming out of the top.  The roll was so soft… Smelled so good, too!

By the time we took it back to the hotel, the roll hardened a bit.  There was no need to cut it, as it unraveled off. We didn’t finish it that night, but Stephen did the next morning for breakfast.